Welcome to the Challenge!!!

KIDS PAYING IT FORWARD

  Home Room 26 Takes Action In The News Moebius Syndrome Go Green! Future Plans For Room 26 5 Steps To Action Levels Of Citizenship Share Your Pay It Forward Story Contact Us

A good citizen is like a good neighbor. He or she follows the law, and makes good choices. This type of citizen is the personally responsible citizen. A personally responsible citizen also helps out in their community by recycling, donating food to a holiday food drive, and giving blood. 

The next type of citizen is referred to as the participatory citizen. This kind of citizen is the one who identifies problems, organizes events in the community to solve the problems, and also participates in them. A participatory citizen might organize a recycling program, a food drive, or a blood drive because they noticed a need for these events in their community.
 
The last level of citizenship is the justice-oriented citizen. This citizen is the one who finds the problem and works to find a solution or law to fix it. The justice-oriented citizen might try to get a bill or law passed in Congress that would help the environment or the homeless community. 

 

Before we started our project, the students in Room 26 were personally responsible citizens. After learning about the different levels of citizenship we moved to the next level, and became participatory citizens by organizing the recycling program for Haley. This year we are working to become justice-oriented citizens by proposing a bill to our California representatives that will help people who cannot pay for their healthcare.

All levels of good citizens are vital to the success of our world. Everyone in the world has the power to make a difference, whether you are giving someone a can of food, or raising money for a little girl in your community. Like it said in the 1st amendment, we have a voice, we have the right to stand up for what we want in our world.

The information summarized in the levels of citizenship section was adapted from Westheimer & Kahne, 2002.